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Sublime Text 3.0

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Sublime Text 3.0 is out!

Compared to the last beta, 3.0 brings a refreshed UI theme, new color schemes, and a new icon. Some of the other highlights are big syntax highlighting improvements, touch input support on Windows, Touch Bar support on macOS, and apt/yum/pacman repositories for Linux.

I wanted to highlight some of the changes from Sublime Text 2 here, however it's surprisingly hard: virtually every aspect of the editor has been improved in some way, and even a list of the major changes would be too long. If you'd like to see the full list of changes, the team has made a dedicated page for them.

Certainly there are big features that 3.0 has: Goto Definition, a new syntax highlighting engine, a new UI, and an expanded API. However the difference is frequently felt in the hundreds of improvements that don't warrant being featured on their own: spell checking works better, automatic indentation does the right thing more often, word wrapping handles source code better, high DPI screens are properly supported, and Goto Anything is smarter. There's too much to list, but combined the difference is night and day.

One of the areas I'm especially proud of in Sublime Text 3 is performance: it's significantly faster than Sublime Text 2 along every axis. Startup is faster, opening files is faster, and scrolling is more efficient. While it's a much larger application than 2, it feels leaner.

If you purchased your Sublime Text license from February 2013 onwards, then it's already valid for Sublime Text 3.0. If your license key is for Sublime Text 1 or 2, then you can purchase an upgrade.

From myself and the team at Sublime HQ, we're very proud of Sublime Text 3.0, and we hope you enjoy it as much as we do. Onwards to 3.1!

Downloads and a full changelog are available on the Sublime Text 3 page.

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wmorrell
11 days ago
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The beta tag is off! Only bit I have noticed in a few hours of working during a conference is the UI looks much sharper compared to last ST3 beta release. Not sure how I feel about the changed sidebar icons (how does /* make sense as an icon for .py?)
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DMack
11 days ago
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Will this win anybody back from Atom or VSCode?
3 little, 3 late?
Victoria, BC
ChrisDL
11 days ago
I am deeply entrenched in atom at this point.... except for when i typescript, and at the point its VSCode all the way baby!
theprawn
11 days ago
I managed to trudge along with sublime. Just couldn't find the time to get comfortable with Atom. So, Yay I guess?
DMack
11 days ago
Atom seems like it was made with Sublime in mind, (down to the UI and the default keybindings), so you should be able to get comfortable in no time. It just won't feel as fast and responsive, is all :( As for VSCode: @ChrisDL, did you see the annoucnement about Atom-IDE? My interest is RATHER piqued to see what will happen there.
theprawn
11 days ago
You'd be surprised how different they feel in the hand after 8+ years of muscle memory. There are actually quite a few subtle differences in binding and interaction that interrupt flow. I'm not saying I couldn't learn it or that there aren't similarities... but it isn't the natural transition I'd thought it might be. Upgrade for sublime is 30 - not bad for the only paid upgrade in so many years.
analogue
11 days ago
Atom can't compete with performance, especially with big files
AaronPresley
11 days ago
Saw the news yesterday and immediately went back to Sublime after several years off of it. It's noticeably more zippy (than Atom), especially so when interacting with a lot of files. Also https://packagecontrol.io was news to me, which I'm a big fan of.

★ X Man

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Assuming today’s new high-end iPhone really is going to be called “iPhone X”, there’s one big question we don’t know the answer to yet: is the “X” an “ex” or a “ten”?

I thought they were going to call it iPhone Pro, so take my guess accordingly, but I say it’s an “ex”, not a “ten”. Here’s why:

  • If it’s a “ten”, many — maybe most — people could call it “ex” anyway. No company knows this better than Apple. I think more people called Mac OS X “oh ess ex” than “oh ess ten”. People see an “X” and they say “ex”.

  • If it’s a “ten”, that makes the iPhones 8 it is debuting alongside look instantly out of date. In fact, 10 vs. 8 would make it look like they’re two generations behind. Apple’s goal should be to make all three new iPhones look new, exciting, and desirable.

  • If it’s a “ten”, that strongly suggests it’s a one-off exception in the product line. What would they call next year’s successor? Calling it “iPhone Ten” only makes sense if this is a one-time product, and making a one-time product makes no sense to me. If it’s “iPhone Ex”, on the other hand, Apple could easily call future models iPhone X2, X3, etc. That sounds pretty cool.

  • If it’s a “ten”, in addition to the problem of naming next year’s successor to the iPhone X, there’s also the question of what they would call the 2019 regular iPhones. It’s certainly possible, if not inevitable, that Apple will eventually stop numbering iPhones, but if the X is a “ten”, that would rule out there ever being an “iPhone 10”.

  • Racer X was cool as shit.

  • Yes, I know, it’s the 10th anniversary of the original iPhone, and Apple is going to celebrate that in several ways in today’s event. So X as “ten” would clearly be in reference to that. But even if they pronounce it “ex”, the X-as-10 thing is still there as an implicit reference.

  • Roman numerals are fucking stupid.

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wmorrell
13 days ago
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*points* haha!
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Subprime borrowers didn't cause the subprime crisis

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Multiple groups of academics have come to the same conclusion: Borrowers in the middle and top of the distribution are the ones that contributed most significantly to the increase in mortgages in default after 2007. During the whole time period, even at the height of the housing boom, sub-prime was never more than 20% of the market. And while it's true that these types of borrowers usually default at relatively higher rates, they didn't after the 2007 housing collapse. ... It was wealthy or middle-class house-flipping speculators who blew up the bubble to cataclysmic proportions, and then wrecked local housing markets when they defaulted en masse.
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wmorrell
13 days ago
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‘If That Worn Out Baseball Glove Tightly Gripping a Turd Can Be President, Then Amigos, Anyone Can.’

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Vincente Fox has Donald Trump’s number. More like this, please.

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wmorrell
17 days ago
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Erik Visits an American Grave, Part 142

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This is the grave of John C. Breckinridge

The traitor Breckinridge was born in 1821 on his slaveholding family’s plantation. His grandfather was Attorney General under Thomas Jefferson and although his father died when he was very young and like many elites of his time was encumbered in debt, young Breckinridge remained among the Kentucky elite. He went to Centre College, spent a year at Princeton, and then received a law degree from Transylvania University in Lexington, where he set up his law practice. He spent a little time in Iowa and then moved back to Georgetown, Kentucky in 1843, starting a practice. He came back to Lexington full time in 1845.

Of course, for a man of Breckinridge’s class, the law was a way to move into politics. The other thing a young ambitious southern elite needed was military experience if the opportunity arose. And it would in 1846, when the U.S. decided to steal the northern half of Mexico to expand slavery. Breckinridge immediately volunteered but had trouble securing a position equal to his social position. Finally, he was named major in the Third Kentucky Infantry. His only real action was serving on Gideon Pillow’s legal team when that general got caught taking credit for Winfield Scott’s victories in order to bolster his own presidential ambitions and hurt Scott’s.

It wasn’t such a great military career, but it was enough for Kentucky politics. Although Breckinridge had uncles who were abolitionists, he embraced his role as a slaveholder. By 1849, he owned five slaves and came out against any government restriction on slavery. He was elected to the Kentucky House that year and quickly became the leader of the Democratic minority there, although the Whigs still held power in the statehouse. In 1851, he was in Congress, where he immediately became an important player. He became a major supporter of Stephen Douglas’ “popular sovereignty” stance, working closely with Douglas and Franklin Pierce to win its passage. As was all too common at the time, he nearly fought a duel with New York’s Francis Cutting, but it was stopped in time. The Whigs in Kentucky gerrymandered Breckinridge out of office for the 1854 elections and he returned to Kentucky rather than run a losing campaign.

Breckinridge was a supporter of Franklin Pierce’s nomination for another term as president in 1856 and when that didn’t happen, he supported Douglas. When James Buchanan won the nomination instead, Breckinridge became the VP candidate as a sop to the other faction. He was never close to Buchanan but moved hard toward his pro-slavery position as the 1850s went on. Seeing his future as a leader of the fireeating pro-slavery faction instead of the more moderate Douglas faction, he split from his former friend and endorsed a federal slave code that would in effect make the protection of slaves the law of the land. When Southern Democrats walked out of the 1860 convention because Douglas was going to win the nomination, they nominated Breckinridge to be their standard bearer. By this time, he had become a full-fledged fire-eater, unlike that sellout Stephen Douglas. Despite the compromise candidate John Bell pushing the “let’s save the union by giving the South everything they want” line, Breckinridge nearly swept the South that fall, although he only received 18% of the national popular vote, behind not only Lincoln but also Douglas. He openly supported the idea of secession, even if he didn’t necessarily believe Kentucky should go down this road. Of course, Lincoln became president and the Civil War was on.

Kentucky sent Breckinridge back to the Senate in 1861, even as he supported the Confederacy. But as Kentucky became more solidly for the union later in 1861, the Kentucky populace began openly calling Breckinridge a traitor for his actions. He didn’t help his position by engaging in full-throated condemnations of Lincoln as a dictator and the normal overheated rhetoric of Democrats at that time. Unionists in Kentucky started arresting leading Kentucky traitors by the summer of 1861 and Breckinridge fled to the Confederacy, where he belonged anyway. In October 1861, he wrote a bitter letter to the people of Kentucky that declared the Union no longer existed and Kentucky should go its own course, preferably with the treasonous slaveholders of the South. On December 2, 1861, the Senate officially declared Breckinridge a traitor and expelled him from the body. That vote was 36-0.

Breckinridge now joined the Confederate military as a brigadier general, largely because he was politically important to the traitors. He commanded troops at Shiloh and was promoted to major general after the battle. Because of the incestuous nature of the Southern elite, Breckinridge had blood relations with Joseph Johnston, Wade Hampton, John Floyd, and other leading Confederate commanders, all of which helped him rise in the Confederate military and which caused resentment from other, less elite, officers. That was the nature of the Confederacy though–a nation of elite anti-democratic aristocrats who not only wanted to keep African-Americans as property to rape and kill at will, but who also rejected democracy explicitly and wanted a romanticized ancient Roman version of government based on their rural estates, even while exporting as much cotton as possible into the capitalist factories where they also held investments. He continued to serve as a general in many of the major battles of the Civil War until January 1865, when he was named as the new Confederate Secretary of State. By this time, he felt his beloved traitorous state was destined to lose and he wanted to work on terms of surrender. After Appomattox, he helped convince Jefferson Davis that the war was over. Unwilling to face the consequences of his grotesque treason, Breckinridge fled first to Cuba and then to Britain and finally to Toronto. From 1866 to 1868, he and his family toured Europe, hardly a just fate for an architect of treason. When the loathsome white supremacist Andrew Johnson issued a full pardon for all the ex-Confederates in late 1868, Breckinridge returned to the U.S. He ended up working for the railroads and staying out of politics until his death in 1875 at the age of 54 from liver problems that partisans claim was from injuries received during the war, but was really about the liquor, for which Breckinridge had a noted love.

The traitor Breckinridge is buried in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky. When I arrived at the grave, there were Confederate flags around it and somehow, someway, before I took the picture they ended up in a nearby trash can. Who can say why.

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wmorrell
20 days ago
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«The traitor Breckinridge is buried in Lexington Cemetery, Lexington, Kentucky. When I arrived at the grave, there were Confederate flags around it and somehow, someway, before I took the picture they ended up in a nearby trash can. Who can say why.»
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On The New York Times’s Claim That Trump’s iPhone Doesn’t Have a Web Browser

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Glenn Thrush and Maggie Haberman, reporting for The New York Times:

Mr. Kelly cannot stop Mr. Trump from binge-watching Fox News, which aides describe as the president’s primary source of information gathering. But Mr. Trump does not have a web browser on his phone, and does not use a laptop, so he was dependent on aides like Stephen K. Bannon, his former chief strategist, to hand-deliver printouts of articles from conservative media outlets.

Now Mr. Kelly has thinned out his package of printouts so much that Mr. Trump plaintively asked a friend recently where The Daily Caller and Breitbart were.

We know that Trump switched from an old Samsung Android phone to an iPhone after taking office, and we can tell from the metadata on his tweets that he’s using the Twitter for iPhone app. That’s led some DF readers to question whether this is even possible, given that you can’t remove Safari by the normal procedure (tapping and holding on the app icon), and the Twitter app has a built-in web browser.

But it is possible. You can remove Safari from the home screen using the Restrictions feature (Settings → General → Restrictions). That still leaves the built-in browser in Twitter, but you can restrict it from reaching any actual websites in the “Allowed Content: Websites” section of the same Restrictions feature. Disable Safari, turn off access to any websites, and you’ve got an iPhone that effectively “doesn’t have a web browser”. And Trump can be locked out of changing these settings by the Restrictions PIN code, which is wholly separate from the device’s main lock screen code. Or, more likely, these restrictions are managed by White House or Secret Service administrators via MDM.

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wmorrell
22 days ago
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petrilli
22 days ago
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You know, like you would a child.
Arlington, VA
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